Not So Hip Anymore: Having Hip Replacement Surgery

Who says technology is putting dangers in our lives? Well, the medical community in New York would be the first to defend it. Prior to the past 50 years, you’d never hear people asking “When is a hip replacement procedure necessary?”—now, thanks to the innovation of medical engineers, the damaged socket-and-ball of a femur can now be successfully replaced and last for more than 20 years.

When is a hip replacement procedure necessary?

The When, How, and What of Hip Replacement Surgery

When is a hip replacement procedure necessary?

A hip replacement surgery is performed on a patient whose hips are not working anymore and causing more pain than relief.

When is a hip replacement procedure necessary? You might be a candidate if: you’re experiencing joint stiffness, swelling and tenderness in your hips, constant hip pain, and a “crunching” sound of bones.

Meanwhile, are you writhing in pain but scared or doubtful of getting one? You may ask, “When is a hip replacement procedure necessary?” because you have not yet gone through an in-depth evaluation.

The answer to “when is a hip replacement procedure necessary” is to let your doctor figure out your condition. Your doctor will have to find out what type of surgery you might need (posterior or anterior) and if you’re eligible to go through an operation.

You also have to watch out for recurrent dislocation because it might require another hip replacement procedure.

For example, a patient had hip replacement surgery but needed another one because of constant dislocation. Doctors replaced her old, dysfunctional joint with a titanium stem ball and socket but the dislocations came back eventually.

In cases like this, this can be prevented if a doctor has specializations in limb reconstruction and joint replacement surgery because they would know that patients have specific limb needs.

How do doctors know the right kind of hip replacement surgery for me?

There are two types of hip replacement surgery—posterior and anterior. The two are usually compared, because anterior is a new approach in hip replacement surgery, while posterior is the most commonly performed on patients.

Comparing them is pointless because patients have diverse needs in their limbs.

For the sake of differentiating them, here you go:

Posterior hip replacement:

  • Performed on the side
  • No risk of nerve damage
  • Good for majority of patients who need it
  • Patient can return to sedentary work after 2 weeks

Anterior hip replacement:

  • Performed on the back, at the front of the upper thigh
  • Good for patients who do not have important hip deformities, flexion contractures or are not obese
  • Patient can return to sedentary work after 1-2 weeks

What to expect after a hip replacement procedure

Both have their risks and benefits, but they both aim to give the patient a well-functioning hip and eliminate the pain from the hip Arthritis.

Particularly, compared to the traditional hip replacement surgery, the anterior hip replacement surgery can reduce soft tissue trauma, post op pain, and blood loss.

After your anterior hip operation, expect easier mobilization and a short hospital stay. It can also prevent recurrent dislocation, saving you money for a potential second hip operation.

Meanwhile, you doctor will instruct you on how to move, sleep, and rest your legs after you get released from the hospital.

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